Citrus County Animal Services

"No Dog Should Die Alone" - Why you should adopt a senior pet.

Today.com
(VERY INSPIRING!)

“I thought it would just be too sad and painful ,” said photographer Lori Fusaro, 44, of Los Angeles (shown in video on left). “I didn’t think my heart could take it, so I wasn’t willing to open myself up.”
HOWEVER... Fast-forward to the present:
Fusaro is lavishing affection on the most recent addition to her family, a sweet-natured 17-year-old dog named Sunny. Sunny re-wired Fusaro’s view of older dogs so completely, that she decided to launch a photography project called “Silver Hearts” to show how much senior pets have to offer. | continue article...

Senior Dogs Vegas Teddy Eva Winn Dixie

Adopting an older dog will save its life.

Many people are quick to adopt puppies and younger dogs, often overlooking dogs over the age of five. Shelters are overcrowded and unfortunately, older dogs are among the first to be euthanized if they aren’t adopted in a timely manner. By adopting a senior dog, you are giving it a home where it can live out its last months/years comfortably, knowing he was loved, and are also saving it from being put down.

Senior dogs at shelters need homes probably more so than younger dogs.

Many older dogs were previously owned and loved by someone. They slept on a soft comfy bed, were given treats and kisses, but for whatever reason, they were given up and abandoned in a shelter. They are now afraid, alone and confused, and are in need of a home. Senior dogs make loyal and loving companions.

Older dogs usually come trained and understand at basic commands.

Most older dogs are already potty-trained and have mastered the basic commands such as “sit,” “stay,” “come,” and “down.” Adopting an already-trained dog will save you a lot of time and energy that you’d normally have to dedicate towards training a young dog.

 

more dogs at our shelter...

 

You can teach an old dog new tricks.

Dogs can be trained at any age. Older dogs have a greater attention span than a puppy, which make them easier to train.

Older dogs are calmer and less energetic than younger dogs.

An adult dog has graduated from the puppy stage and has an established demeanor and temperament, which will give you an instant idea of how it will fit into your household. Older dogs have all their adult teeth and are out of the energetic puppy phase, which will result in less destruction to your home. Many of them do well with young children as they have a lower energy level and have possibly lived with them in their past homes. However... don't let the "lower energy" be misconstrued. Some older dogs still love to play frisbee, fetch, want to jog with you, etc. They would just be a little more "obedient" you might say.

Older dogs make instant companions.

Unlike a puppy, which requires leash training, etc., an older dog is ready to accompany you on a long walk and already knows how to play fetch. An older dog would make a great workout partner, a loyal companion, and a best friend.